per amica silentia lunae

or, across the ferny brae with the evil voodoo celt

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"Overhead, without any fuss, the stars were going out."
dream
evcelt
R.I.P., Sir Arthur C. Clarke

Clarke was one of my earliest SF influences- one of a few authors recommended me by my Dad. His work continually blew my mind with new concepts and sent chills up my spine. He created short stories that were almost jewel-perfect ("A Wind From the Sun"), novels that created complex worlds with subtlety and suggestion ("Rendezvous with Rama", which incidentally has one of the spookiest endings in SF), and works that are almost impossible to classify ("Against the Fall of Night"). He had a great sense of the awesome, the melancholy, and the terrifying aspects of space, time, and future technologies.

His influence was felt in space travel and film as well as SF.

He was one of the writers who opened my eyes and mind to wonder.

He will be missed.

---
the post's title is the last sentence of one of my favorite stories of his, The Nine Billion Names of God. It still makes me shiver...

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Let us hope that at least his star will still shine on and inspire others in his work. An examples is this paraphased quote by a physicist from NASA/Goddard "We were all sitting around the table talking, and realised we had all read Clarke"

As to the the title of your post, I'm still not sure I want to know all the names of God, as what if he was right?

As to the the title of your post, I'm still not sure I want to know all the names of God, as what if he was right?

"Nine billion names of God on the wall,
Nine billion names of God;
Take one down, pass it around-
Eight billion, nine hundred ninety-nine million, nine hundred ninety-nine thousand, nine hundred ninety-nine names of God on the wall!"

Thanks for the quote. That's still one of my all time favorite works of his, and one of my favorite short stories period.

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