per amica silentia lunae

or, across the ferny brae with the evil voodoo celt

Previous Entry Share Next Entry
Review the work, don't review the audience
dream
evcelt
http://www.npr.org/blogs/monkeysee/2010/08/12/129150813/-scott-pilgrim-versus-the-unfortunate-tendency-to-review-the-audience

I haven't seen the movie, but this still resonates with me. I see plenty of examples of the "I hated it = it sucks = anyone who liked it sucks" chain of reasoning out there... and I've occasionally been (unintentionally, I hope) lumped into the latter category by friends.

Of course, I'm sure I've been guilty of the same behavior myself, but I try to watch out for it. It's another pitfall on the path of compassion, another way to "other" people who have characteristics you don't like...

Also relevant:
http://www.avclub.com/articles/does-what-you-like-define-who-you-are,45216/

  • 1
I do find that the older I get, the more shades of gray I find there are - and the more adamant I am about pointing it out to anyone who says otherwise :-) (You know, just to make sure I don't actually mellow with age....)

"Ah, but I was so much older then
I’m younger than that now."

Not to mention the related failing of "the target audience for this is such-and-such kind of people, who are losers, therefore it must suck, regardless of what it actually is." There's no shortage of eye-rolling reviews of that type on radio and TV (it seems to be a bit harder to do in print.)

A semi related phenomenon is the whole "I hate it because of the crowd it's popular with" or just plain "I hate it because it's popular".

The Twilight book series is a good example of that. There are alot of people out there who can't stand it not because of its content but because of the fact that it's popular with teenage girls. Some people claim they don't like it because of some of the themes in the book and some of those people might legitimately feel that way but I think a majority of the people who can't stand it already hate it because of the crowd it's popular with and are using "that" as a rational to explain why they hate a book they have never read and have no intention of ever reading.

There are any number of other shows/movies/books that could fall into this category.


I've avoided that series because almost everything I've heard about it makes me gag. The target audience has nothing to do with it.

Oh I know, I was just citing that as an example b/c alot of people dislike it not b/c of the content but b/c of the people who read it. I agree there are plenty of people with legitimate beefs with that series but there are also alot of people who know next to nothing about it aside from it's target audience and hate it any way for that reason. There are lots of people out there who hate things and know nothing about them aside from who "does" like it.

Did that make any sense? I just can't tell today, my brain is very foggy.

Something I suspect we're all guilty of from time to time, but this is a good reminder to pause and think, thanks. (I still really want to see this movie actually)

On a related(ish) note - I think this also very much pertains to politics. I heard an interesting interview on NPR the other day for instance on origins of the current tea party movement, how it came from protests primarily about bailouts and started as a movement about fiscal conservatism, nothing at all to do with the religious right, and stemmed from the conservative beliefs of a hispanic woman, not a white male. People (myself included) may at times have a tendency to knee-jerk react to someone who identifies with a political movement like this for instance "oh - I'm going to dismiss anything you say now, you're one of *those*", which is patently ridiculous.

  • 1
?

Log in

No account? Create an account